the-times-like-these:

cute-animals-only:

Fox named “Весна” - Spring in Russian ;-)

OMG I WANT

(Source: zarsas.com)

31,139 notes

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

femalegaze:

schmurple:

think-progress:

Arizona Professor Offers Extra Credit To Female Students Who Stop Shaving Their Armpits

Professor Breanne Fahs offers female students extra-credit if they “stop shaving their legs and underarms for ten weeks during the semester while keeping a journal to document their experiences.” For Fahs, who teaches women and gender studies, the purpose is to get students thinking critically about societal norms and gender roles.
A similar opportunity is available to men in Fahs’ classes who recieve extra credit for shaving all of their hair from the neck down.
One student, Stephanie Robinson, described it as a “life-changing experience:
"Many of my friends didn’t want to work out next to me or hear about the assignment, and my mother was distraught at the idea that I would be getting married in a white dress with armpit hair. I also noticed the looks on faces of strangers and people around campus who seemed utterly disgusted by my body hair. It definitely made me realize that if you’re not strictly adhering to socially prescribed gender roles, your body becomes a site for contestation and public opinion."

They published a paper about this the first time someone did it, and it showed that non-white young women experienced a lot more pressure from friends and relatives to remove their hair. The authors suggested that because beauty standards are white - long, fine, flowy blonde hair, blue eyes, etc, etc - his body hair non-conformity was more troubling in WOC, as they crossed yet another boundary of femininity. They were also more likely to have darker or thicker body hair, so it would stand out more than on the blonde women, for example. 

For me that sort of exemplifies why it’s so important to have multiple, intersectional feminisms. Because “let’s not shave our legs!” might be a powerful and important message, but it’s ultimately one of white privilege that sort of ignores the whiteness of these beauty standards in the first place.

2,548 notes

tuscanystuff:

I actually really like this ad campaign.

(Source: drawing-interrupted)

213,819 notes

importantbirds:

canadian-asian:

THE CUTEST BIRD IN THE WORLD (The Japanese Long Tailed Tit)

Secret only share… This birb actual marchmello who learn a fly!
Keep outta a sun, tiny peep!

228,714 notes

cheese3d:

i think i can accurately say that i can crush a man’s head with my thighs

247,078 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.
It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.

It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

4,902 notes

thecutestofthecute:

Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Appreciation Post

128,649 notes